VISITING HOSPITAL

Hospital visitors must wear a medical paper face mask. Fabric face coverings are not acceptable. Expand this message for more detailed information about hospital visiting guidelines.

Last updated:
16 September 2022

 

Mask exemptions accepted for people seeking treatment
Any member of the public with a mask exemption is welcome in all our facilities when attending to receive health care and *treatment. Please show your mask exemption card and appointment letter to staff at the entrance.

*Treatment includes: coming into the Emergency Department, outpatient appointments,  surgery or a procedure.

For visitors to all facilities effective from Friday 16 September 2022

Some visitor restrictions for all Te Whatu Ora Waitaha Canterbury hospitals and health facilities remain in place, but we have relaxed others.

There is still a heightened risk to vulnerable people in hospital and so people must continue to wear a mask when visiting any of our facilities and follow other advice designed to keep patients, staff and other visitors safe.

Kia whakahaumaru te whānau, me ngā iwi katoa – this is to keep everybody safe:

  • Visitors or support people must not visit our facilities if they are unwell. Do not visit if you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and haven’t completed your isolation period.
  • Patients may have more than one visitor, except in some situations such as multi-bed rooms where it can cause overcrowding.
  • Surgical/medical masks must be worn at all sites. Masks will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • For Specialist Mental Health Services everyone is strongly encouraged to wear a surgical mask in all inpatient areas and areas where consumers are receiving care (i.e. community appointments, home-visits, transporting people). Discretion may be applied in cases where masks impair your ability to communicate effectively.
  • Visitors must not eat or drink in multibed rooms because of the increased risk when multiple people remove their mask in the same space.
  • Hand sanitiser is available and must be used.

Thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as our staff work hard to protect and care for some of the most vulnerable in our community.

Visiting patients with COVID-19

  • People are able to visit patients who have COVID-19 but they must wear an N95 mask – this will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • Other methods of communication will be facilitated e.g. phone, Facetime, Zoom, WhatApp etc where visits aren’t possible.

All of our Hospitals

Visiting hours for our hospitals have returned to pre COVID-19 hours with the exception of Christchurch Women’s Hospital.

All visitors must wear a medical mask.

Parents/caregivers are able to be with their child in hospital and visitors other than a parent or caregiver are now allowed, except for the Children’s Haematology and Oncology Day stay where just one parent/caregiver is able to attend their appointment with their child. Exceptions by special arrangement only.

Patients and visitors should also read the additional more detailed visiting guidelines for each specific hospital.

More COVID-19 information

Glossary

AJAX progress indicator
  • When you stay at a hospital rounding or rounds are when nurses check in on you regularly to make sure you have everything you need (e.g. call bell and drink within reach, help to the toilet).
  • ACCThe Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) is the New Zealand Crown entity providing comprehensive no-fault personal accident cover for all New Zealanders.
  • AcuteHealth care that you receive in hospital following an injury, operation or illness. It is different to any care you may receive for an ongoing health condition from your GP, community nurse or other professionals in the community where you live.
  • Acute careHealth care that you receive in hospital following an injury, operation or illness. It is different to any care you may receive for an ongoing health condition from your GP, community nurse or other professionals in the community where you live.
  • Acute Medical Assessment UnitA Christchurch Hospital inpatient unit concerned with the immediate and early specialist management of patients with a wide range of medical conditions who present in hospital as emergencies.
  • after hoursAfter-hours care (often just referred to as "after-hours" or "after-hours urgent care clinics") are services for urgent or acute medical needs available at times when a patient has no access to their normal general practitioner, such as when they are closed after regular daytime business(...)
  • after hours careAfter-hours care (often just referred to as "after-hours" or "after-hours urgent care clinics") are services for urgent or acute medical needs available at times when a patient has no access to their normal general practitioner, such as when they are closed after regular daytime business(...)
  • after hours clinicAfter-hours care (often just referred to as "after-hours" or "after-hours urgent care clinics") are services for urgent or acute medical needs available at times when a patient has no access to their normal general practitioner, such as when they are closed after regular daytime business(...)
  • after-hour'sAfter-hours care (often just referred to as "after-hours" or "after-hours urgent care clinics") are services for urgent or acute medical needs available at times when a patient has no access to their normal general practitioner, such as when they are closed after regular daytime business(...)
  • after-hoursAfter-hours care (often just referred to as "after-hours" or "after-hours urgent care clinics") are services for urgent or acute medical needs available at times when a patient has no access to their normal general practitioner, such as when they are closed after regular daytime business(...)
  • after-hours careAfter-hours care (often just referred to as "after-hours" or "after-hours urgent care clinics") are services for urgent or acute medical needs available at times when a patient has no access to their normal general practitioner, such as when they are closed after regular daytime business(...)
  • afterhoursAfter-hours care (often just referred to as "after-hours" or "after-hours urgent care clinics") are services for urgent or acute medical needs available at times when a patient has no access to their normal general practitioner, such as when they are closed after regular daytime business(...)
  • AMAUA Christchurch Hospital inpatient unit concerned with the immediate and early specialist management of patients with a wide range of medical conditions who present in hospital as emergencies.
  • ArohaLove, affectionate regard. Also, Pity, compassion (Te Reo Māori).
  • Bedside boardsA Bedside board is a board near your bed is regularly updated to show your needs (e.g. any assistance needed with moving, hearing or sight aids, or special diet). There is space on the board for you or your family to list any questions you want answered.
  • Bedside handoverA bedside handover usually happens at the end of the morning shift, nurses will discuss important updates with you and hand over ongoing tasks to the afternoon shift.
  • CAAChildren's Acute Assessment (CAA) is a part of Children’s Emergency Care (CEC) and provides an assessment service for children/teenagers with acute medical and some surgical conditions.
  • Canterbury Clinical NetworkCanterbury Clinical Network is an alliance of Canterbury health professionals, including GPs, secondary care specialists, practice nurses, community nurses, physiotherapists, community pharmacists, Māori and Pacific health providers, PHOs, IPAs and the DHB. The CCN was established with the(...)
  • Canterbury Community Pharmacy GroupCanterbury Community Pharmacy Group (CCPG) is an organisation representing pharmacists in Canterbury, New Zealand.
  • Catering AssistantCatering Assistants/Kaiāwhina Whakatutuki provide a personal meal service with food and drinks according to your dietary needs.
  • CCNCanterbury Clinical Network is an alliance of Canterbury health professionals, including GPs, secondary care specialists, practice nurses, community nurses, physiotherapists, community pharmacists, Māori and Pacific health providers, PHOs, IPAs and the DHB. The CCN was established with the(...)
  • CCPGCanterbury Community Pharmacy Group (CCPG) is an organisation representing pharmacists in Canterbury, New Zealand.
  • ConsentWhen you give your permission to someone to do something to you or for you.
  • ConsultantA senior hospital doctor or surgeon who is a specialist in their field.
  • DietitianDietitians/Pūkenga Whakaita Kai give advice and counselling about diet, food and nutrition to individuals and communities. They also design nutrition programmes to support health and wellbeing.
  • EligibilityWhen your needs fit the criteria that allow you to receive a service.
  • HauoraHealth, vigour (Te reo Māori)
  • Health New ZealandTe Whatu Ora - Health New Zealand leads the day-to-day running of the health system and unites the former 20 District Health Boards, shared services agencies and Te Hiringa Hauora - Health Promotion Agency under one national organisation. It leads and coordinates delivery of health services,(...)
  • Health Care AssistantHealth Care Assistants/Tiaki hauora kaiāwhina provide basic care, observe patients under the direction of a Registered Nurse and ensure patients have the best experience possible.
  • HNZTe Whatu Ora - Health New Zealand leads the day-to-day running of the health system and unites the former 20 District Health Boards, shared services agencies and Te Hiringa Hauora - Health Promotion Agency under one national organisation. It leads and coordinates delivery of health services,(...)
  • House OfficerQualified doctor who has not begun specialist training. Also known as a House Surgeon or an Intern.
  • House SurgeonQualified doctor who has not begun specialist training. Also known as a House Officer or and Intern.
  • HuiGathering, meeting (Te reo Māori)
  • ICU Outreach TeamIntensive Care Outreach is a service provided by the intensive care team to assist with ward patients who have become progressively more unwell. They provide assistance with patient care in the Ward, and assess the requirement for admission to the intensive care unit.
  • Intensive Care Outreach TeamIntensive Care Outreach is a service provided by the intensive care team to assist with ward patients who have become progressively more unwell. They provide assistance with patient care in the Ward, and assess the requirement for admission to the intensive care unit.
  • Intensive Care OutreachIntensive Care Outreach is a service provided by the intensive care team to assist with ward patients who have become progressively more unwell. They provide assistance with patient care in the Ward, and assess the requirement for admission to the intensive care unit.
  • IwiExtended kinship group, tribe, nation, people, nationality, race. Iwi often refers to a large group of people descended from a common ancestor and associated with a distinct territory. (Te reo Māori)
  • Kaiāwhina WhakatutukiCatering Assistants/Kaiāwhina Whakatutuki provide a personal meal service with food and drinks according to your dietary needs.
  • Kaihaumanu Reo ā-WahaSpeech Language Therapists/Kaihaumanu Reo ā-Waha (SLTs) assess and treat people who have problems with communication or swallowing. This may include difficulties with speech, language, thought processes or moving their bodies.
  • Kaimahi Toko i te OraSocial Workers/Kaimahi Toko i te Ora provide care, advice and support to people with personal or social problems, and help with community and social issues.
  • Kaimahi Hauora MāoriA Māori Health worker/Kaimahi Hauora Māori provides tautoko (cultural support and advice) to tūroro (patients) and their whānau (family members) while they are in the hospital. They may also advocate for patients and provide them with information and resources to help your recovery if needed.
  • KairomiromiPhysiotherapists/Kairomiromi (Physios) help patients recover from disability or problems caused by physical, brain, and nervous system disorders to restore function and independence.
  • Kaiwhakaora NgangahauOccupational Therapists/Kaiwhakaora Ngangahau (OTs) assess and treat people who have trouble with everyday activities because of illness, injury or circumstance.
  • KaumātuaAdult, elder, elderly man or woman. A person of status within the whānau. (Te reo Māori)
  • KeteBasket, kit. (Te reo Māori)
  • Kōhanga Reo, TePreschool (Te Reo Māori)
  • KōreroSpeech, narrative, story, discussion, conversation. (Te reo Māori)
  • MahiWork, job, trade (work). (Te reo Māori)
  • mamaMother, mum. (Te reo Māori)
  • ManaPrestige, authority, control, power, influence, status, spiritual power, charisma. Mana is a supernatural force in a person, place or object. (Te reo Māori)
  • Maori Health workerA Māori Health worker/Kaimahi Hauora Māori provides tautoko (cultural support and advice) to tūroro (patients) and their whānau (family members) while they are in the hospital. They may also advocate for patients and provide them with information and resources to help your recovery if needed.
  • Māori Health workerA Māori Health worker/Kaimahi Hauora Māori provides tautoko (cultural support and advice) to tūroro (patients) and their whānau (family members) while they are in the hospital. They may also advocate for patients and provide them with information and resources to help your recovery if needed.
  • MidwifeMidwives/Tapuhi ā-Whare provide care and support to women, their partners and family/whānau during pregnancy, labour and birth, and for six weeks following the birth. They also provide wellness and parenting advice to mothers and families.
  • MorbidityIllness, sickness.
  • MortalityDeath.
  • MotuCountry, land, nation. (Te reo Māori)
  • National Immunisation RegisterThe National Immunisation Register (NIR) is a computerised information system that has been developed to hold immunisation details of New Zealand children.
  • NIRThe National Immunisation Register (NIR) is a computerised information system that has been developed to hold immunisation details of New Zealand children.
  • NPNurse Practitioners (NP) are highly-trained and experienced nurses who assess, diagnose, treat, prescribe and manage care across different healthcare services.
  • Nurse PractitionerNurse Practitioners (NP) are highly-trained and experienced nurses who assess, diagnose, treat, prescribe and manage care across different healthcare services.
  • Occupational TherapistOccupational Therapists/Kaiwhakaora Ngangahau (OTs) assess and treat people who have trouble with everyday activities because of illness, injury or circumstance.
  • OrderlyOrderlies/Tika help clinical staff take care of patients’ needs by transporting patients; delivering samples, oxygen, and clinical documents; maintaining and cleaning equipment; and other tasks.
  • OTOccupational Therapists/Kaiwhakaora Ngangahau (OTs) assess and treat people who have trouble with everyday activities because of illness, injury or circumstance.
  • Outpatient AdministratorOutpatient Administrators/Kaiwhakahaere arrive and depart patients attending appointments and manage bookings to ensure patients receive treatment within the required guidelines.
  • Palliative careCare that you receive if you have an advanced, progressive illness for which there is no cure. The aim is to manage pain and other symptoms and to help you have best quality of life you can. It may be provided in your home or in a hospital or hospice.
  • panuiNewsletter/Notice/Announcement (Māori: Pānui).
  • PepeBaby (Te reo Māori)
  • Pharmacy staffPharmacy staff/kaimahi rongoā work with the medical teams to ensure we have an up-to-date list of your medicines, record any allergies you have and provide information on new medicines started.
  • PHOPrimary health organisations (PHOs) ensure the provision of essential primary health care services, mostly through general practices, to people who are enrolled with the PHO/General Practice. PHOs are funded by district health boards (DHBs), who focus on the health of their population.
  • PhysioPhysiotherapists/Kairomiromi (Physios) help patients recover from disability or problems caused by physical, brain, and nervous system disorders to restore function and independence.
  • PhysiotherapistPhysiotherapists/Kairomiromi (Physios) help patients recover from disability or problems caused by physical, brain, and nervous system disorders to restore function and independence.
  • Primary health careThe first point of contact in the health system, usually your general practice doctor (GP), practice nurse, local pharmacist, dentist or urgent care clinic. Primary care doctors deal with a wide range of health problems. They treat common illnesses, help you manage long-term conditions and(...)
  • Primary careThe first point of contact in the health system, usually your general practice doctor (GP), practice nurse, local pharmacist, dentist or urgent care clinic. Primary care doctors deal with a wide range of health problems. They treat common illnesses, help you manage long-term conditions and(...)
  • Primary health organisationsPrimary health organisations (PHOs) ensure the provision of essential primary health care services, mostly through general practices, to people who are enrolled with the PHO/General Practice. PHOs are funded by district health boards (DHBs), who focus on the health of their population.
  • ProtocolA set of rules or instructions about how something should be done.
  • Pūkenga Whakaita KaiDietitians/Pūkenga Whakaita Kai give advice and counselling about diet, food and nutrition to individuals and communities. They also design nutrition programmes to support health and wellbeing.
  • RangatahiYounger generation, youth (Te reo Māori)
  • ReferralA referral is when your family doctor (GP) or another health professional will pass a matter to a specialist for a decision or treatment. Usually, because your doctor wants a specialist’s help to treat a condition that cannot be done by your general practice team.
  • Registered NurseRegistered Nurses/Tapuhi Whai Rēhitatanga assess, treat, care for and support patients in hospitals, clinics, residential care facilities and their homes.
  • RegistrarAn experienced doctor training in a specialty
  • Resident Medical OfficerA House Surgeon or Registrar
  • RMOA House Surgeon or Registrar
  • RNRegistered Nurses/Tapuhi Whai Rēhitatanga assess, treat, care for and support patients in hospitals, clinics, residential care facilities and their homes.
  • RoundWhen you stay at a hospital rounding or rounds are when nurses check in on you regularly to make sure you have everything you need (e.g. call bell and drink within reach, help to the toilet).
  • RoundingWhen you stay at a hospital rounding or rounds are when nurses check in on you regularly to make sure you have everything you need (e.g. call bell and drink within reach, help to the toilet).
  • Secondary careCare that you receive in hospital, either as an inpatient or an outpatient. This may be planned or emergency care. It is more specialist than primary care.
  • self referA service that that offers self-referral essentially means that people do not need to be referred by their doctor, or another health professional, but can contact a health service directly. However, once people self-refer, they are usually assessed, like everyone else.
  • self referringA service that that offers self-referral essentially means that people do not need to be referred by their doctor, or another health professional, but can contact a health service directly. However, once people self-refer, they are usually assessed, like everyone else.
  • self-referA service that that offers self-referral essentially means that people do not need to be referred by their doctor, or another health professional, but can contact a health service directly. However, once people self-refer, they are usually assessed, like everyone else.
  • Self-referralA service that that offers self-referral essentially means that people do not need to be referred by their doctor, or another health professional, but can contact a health service directly. However, once people self-refer, they are usually assessed, like everyone else.
  • self-referringA service that that offers self-referral essentially means that people do not need to be referred by their doctor, or another health professional, but can contact a health service directly. However, once people self-refer, they are usually assessed, like everyone else.
  • SLTSpeech Language Therapists/Kaihaumanu Reo ā-Waha (SLTs) assess and treat people who have problems with communication or swallowing. This may include difficulties with speech, language, thought processes or moving their bodies.
  • SMOA senior doctor or surgeon who has specialised in a certain field. Also known as an SMO or a Specialist.
  • Social WorkerSocial Workers/Kaimahi Toko i te Ora provide care, advice and support to people with personal or social problems, and help with community and social issues.
  • Specialist Medical OfficerA senior doctor or surgeon who has specialised in a certain field. Also known as an SMO or a Specialist.
  • Speech Language TherapistSpeech Language Therapists/Kaihaumanu Reo ā-Waha (SLTs) assess and treat people who have problems with communication or swallowing. This may include difficulties with speech, language, thought processes or moving their bodies.
  • TamarikiChildren (Te reo Māori)
  • TaneMen. Tāne Māori refers to Māori men. (Te reo Māori)
  • Tapuhi ā-WhareMidwives/Tapuhi ā-Whare provide care and support to women, their partners and family/whānau during pregnancy, labour and birth, and for six weeks following the birth. They also provide wellness and parenting advice to mothers and families.
  • Te Whatu OraTe Whatu Ora - Health New Zealand leads the day-to-day running of the health system and unites the former 20 District Health Boards, shared services agencies and Te Hiringa Hauora - Health Promotion Agency under one national organisation. It leads and coordinates delivery of health services,(...)
  • TikaOrderlies/Tika help clinical staff take care of patients’ needs by transporting patients; delivering samples, oxygen, and clinical documents; maintaining and cleaning equipment; and other tasks.
  • TriageThe process of deciding whether you need urgent medical attention, and how long you are able to wait. When you go to the hospital Emergency Department or to an urgent care clinic, you will be asked questions about your symptoms. A decision will then be taken about how quickly you need to be(...)
  • WāhineWomen. Wāhine Māori refers to Māori women. (Te reo Māori)
  • WaitahaCanterbury (Māori: Waitaha) region.
  • Ward ClerkWard Clerks welcome patients and their visitors to the ward, ensure patient records are updated and liaise with other departments e.g. to make follow-up appointments.
  • Ward roundWard rounds are when members of your health care team visit each bed and give you an opportunity to ask questions.
  • WhakataukīWhakataukī (Māori proverbs) are often used in both formal speeches and everyday conversation.
  • WhānauExtended family, family group; familiar term of address to a number of people; the primary economic unit of traditional Māori society. In the modern context, the term is sometimes used to include friends who may not have any kinship ties to other members. (Te reo Māori)
  • WhenuaLand (Te reo Māori)

Page last updated: 11 February 2020

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