VISITING HOSPITAL

Hospital visitors must wear a medical paper face mask. Fabric face coverings are not acceptable. Expand this message for more detailed information about hospital visiting guidelines.

Last updated:
16 September 2022

 

Mask exemptions accepted for people seeking treatment
Any member of the public with a mask exemption is welcome in all our facilities when attending to receive health care and *treatment. Please show your mask exemption card and appointment letter to staff at the entrance.

*Treatment includes: coming into the Emergency Department, outpatient appointments,  surgery or a procedure.

For visitors to all facilities effective from Friday 16 September 2022

Some visitor restrictions for all Te Whatu Ora Waitaha Canterbury hospitals and health facilities remain in place, but we have relaxed others.

There is still a heightened risk to vulnerable people in hospital and so people must continue to wear a mask when visiting any of our facilities and follow other advice designed to keep patients, staff and other visitors safe.

Kia whakahaumaru te whānau, me ngā iwi katoa – this is to keep everybody safe:

  • Visitors or support people must not visit our facilities if they are unwell. Do not visit if you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and haven’t completed your isolation period.
  • Patients may have more than one visitor, except in some situations such as multi-bed rooms where it can cause overcrowding.
  • Surgical/medical masks must be worn at all sites. Masks will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • For Specialist Mental Health Services everyone is strongly encouraged to wear a surgical mask in all inpatient areas and areas where consumers are receiving care (i.e. community appointments, home-visits, transporting people). Discretion may be applied in cases where masks impair your ability to communicate effectively.
  • Visitors must not eat or drink in multibed rooms because of the increased risk when multiple people remove their mask in the same space.
  • Hand sanitiser is available and must be used.

Thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as our staff work hard to protect and care for some of the most vulnerable in our community.

Visiting patients with COVID-19

  • People are able to visit patients who have COVID-19 but they must wear an N95 mask – this will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • Other methods of communication will be facilitated e.g. phone, Facetime, Zoom, WhatApp etc where visits aren’t possible.

All of our Hospitals

Visiting hours for our hospitals have returned to pre COVID-19 hours with the exception of Christchurch Women’s Hospital.

All visitors must wear a medical mask.

Parents/caregivers are able to be with their child in hospital and visitors other than a parent or caregiver are now allowed, except for the Children’s Haematology and Oncology Day stay where just one parent/caregiver is able to attend their appointment with their child. Exceptions by special arrangement only.

Patients and visitors should also read the additional more detailed visiting guidelines for each specific hospital.

More COVID-19 information

Canterbury DHB welcomes announcement of more funds to support the wellbeing of children

Thursday 22 February 2018Media release2 minutes to read

THIS IS AN ARCHIVED PAGE. The advice and information contained in this page may not be current and it should only be used for historical reference purposes.

Canterbury DHB Chief Executive David Meates, today welcomed the Prime Minister's announcement of an additional $28 million over the next three years to support the wellbeing of children in Years 1-8.

“We've been concerned about the impact of the quakes on the wellbeing of children in Canterbury for some time now. To date there have been a number of agencies and individuals involved in supporting Canterbury kids, including our own small School-Based Mental Health team who have done an amazing job.

“This new targeted funding will allow us to provide more and earlier support for schools to take a holistic approach to the wellbeing of some of our most vulnerable community members. Many of these children have grown up in households where parents have had to focus considerable time and energy on dealing with significant post-quake stressors such as ongoing battles with insurance and house repairs. This is in addition to the anxiety and fear of experiencing the many thousands of quakes which have hit our region.

“This boost to the number and range of health professionals and support workers focused on the wellbeing of young children will see those in need receive support sooner.  We will be working closely with the Ministry of Education to design a system that works for children, their families/whānau, caregivers and teachers.   

“I am thrilled that Sir John Hansen chair of the Canterbury Clinical Network will lead the development work on this initiative. While much of the detail is still to be worked through, a decision has been made to start with two Kāhui Ako (Communities of Learning) – Tamai located in Christchurch East and Hornby in the West.

“We are keen to retain and build on the expertise already in place and envisage a team which could include social workers, nurses or occupational therapists and others as part of the programme. 

“Before the programme is rolled out to all quake-affected schools in Greater Christchurch and North Canterbury, consistent ways of working, along with appropriate training will be developed to ensure that what we create is sustainable and effective.

“Focusing on the wellbeing of children is an investment in the future of our community, and we are committed to getting this programme up and running as soon as possible. Until the roll-out is complete we will continue to support schools through existing services,” David Meates said.

ENDS

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Page last updated: 19 October 2022

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