VISITING HOSPITAL

Hospital visitors must wear a medical paper face mask. Fabric face coverings are not acceptable. Expand this message for more detailed information about hospital visiting guidelines.

Last updated:
16 September 2022

 

Mask exemptions accepted for people seeking treatment
Any member of the public with a mask exemption is welcome in all our facilities when attending to receive health care and *treatment. Please show your mask exemption card and appointment letter to staff at the entrance.

*Treatment includes: coming into the Emergency Department, outpatient appointments,  surgery or a procedure.

For visitors to all facilities effective from Friday 16 September 2022

Some visitor restrictions for all Te Whatu Ora Waitaha Canterbury hospitals and health facilities remain in place, but we have relaxed others.

There is still a heightened risk to vulnerable people in hospital and so people must continue to wear a mask when visiting any of our facilities and follow other advice designed to keep patients, staff and other visitors safe.

Kia whakahaumaru te whānau, me ngā iwi katoa – this is to keep everybody safe:

  • Visitors or support people must not visit our facilities if they are unwell. Do not visit if you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and haven’t completed your isolation period.
  • Patients may have more than one visitor, except in some situations such as multi-bed rooms where it can cause overcrowding.
  • Surgical/medical masks must be worn at all sites. Masks will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • For Specialist Mental Health Services everyone is strongly encouraged to wear a surgical mask in all inpatient areas and areas where consumers are receiving care (i.e. community appointments, home-visits, transporting people). Discretion may be applied in cases where masks impair your ability to communicate effectively.
  • Visitors must not eat or drink in multibed rooms because of the increased risk when multiple people remove their mask in the same space.
  • Hand sanitiser is available and must be used.

Thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as our staff work hard to protect and care for some of the most vulnerable in our community.

Visiting patients with COVID-19

  • People are able to visit patients who have COVID-19 but they must wear an N95 mask – this will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • Other methods of communication will be facilitated e.g. phone, Facetime, Zoom, WhatApp etc where visits aren’t possible.

All of our Hospitals

Visiting hours for our hospitals have returned to pre COVID-19 hours with the exception of Christchurch Women’s Hospital.

All visitors must wear a medical mask.

Parents/caregivers are able to be with their child in hospital and visitors other than a parent or caregiver are now allowed, except for the Children’s Haematology and Oncology Day stay where just one parent/caregiver is able to attend their appointment with their child. Exceptions by special arrangement only.

Patients and visitors should also read the additional more detailed visiting guidelines for each specific hospital.

More COVID-19 information

Canterbury supports WHO call to handle antibiotics with care

Wednesday 15 November 2017Media release3 minutes to read

THIS IS AN ARCHIVED PAGE. The advice and information contained in this page may not be current and it should only be used for historical reference purposes.

Canterbury Health System is getting behind World Antibiotics Awareness Week and you should too – antibiotic resistance caused by the misuse or overuse of antibiotics is one of the biggest threats to global health today. So if ever there was good reason for having a health-themed week and something worth getting behind, this is it.

This week the World Health Organization is asking health systems across the world to promote the message that antibiotics must be ‘Handled with Care'. We agree.

Canterbury DHB CEO David Meates says if we carry on as we are, antibiotic-resistant microbes are predicted to kill more than 10 million people worldwide every year by 2050 and cost the global economy US$100 trillion.

“But we don't have to carry on as we are and there are things everyone, including you, can do to help – starting with finding out more by reading on.”

Each time antibiotics are used there is a chance that some bacteria will survive and be resistant to future treatment – which is why you should use them according to medical advice and only when it is absolutely necessary.

If we overuse antibiotics they might not work when you really need them and leave you vulnerable to new infections for a while. Even when used correctly, antibiotics can have side effects such as skin rashes, diarrhoea, or thrush – that may be because each treatment wipes out the good bacteria along with the bad and leaves the way clear for the wrong bacteria to become dominant.

Here's what you can do:

  • Only take antibiotics that have been prescribed specifically for you.
  • Seek advice and follow directions from your prescriber or a pharmacist.
  • Clean your hands frequently using soap and water or hand sanitiser, especially:
    • before eating;
    • after going to the toilet;
    • when visiting vulnerable people – in hospital or aged residential care homes; and
    • after handling compost or soil.

What not to do:

  • Don't take them, or ask for them, for viruses like a cold or flu. They won't help and will probably make you feel worse.
  • Don't take antibiotics prescribed for someone else.
  • Don't keep antibiotics from a previous treatment – it's too easy for them to be misused later.

Here's what we are doing

As part of a joint project with the Canterbury Initiative, our other CCN partners – the Canterbury Community Pharmacy Group and the Department of General Practice at the University of Otago – we have created some resources for general practice and pharmacy.

Look out for a ‘waiting room' poster that pushes the message that antibiotics don't fix everything and prompts people to seek advice from their prescriber or a pharmacist.

Look out too for a ‘consulting room' pledge poster which confirms your health provider's commitment to always providing the best care for your needs  – which will not involve prescribing antibiotics where they would do more harm than good.

“While the ‘Handle with Care' message is relatively simple and we hope this week will boost awareness of the issue, together we need to become part of a massive worldwide shift in how we think about using antibiotics,” Mr Meates says.

ENDS

For more information, visit WHO World Antibiotic Awareness Week.

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Page last updated: 19 October 2022

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