RED

Hospital visitors don’t need a Vaccine Pass, but do need to scan in, and wear a surgical/medical paper mask. Fabric face coverings are no longer acceptable. See our COVID-19 pages for visiting guidelines, COVID-19 tests and care in the community advice. See www.vaccinatecanterburywestcoast.nz for info about vaccinations.

We are at RED according to the NZ COVID-19 Protection Framework

Last updated:
23 January 2022

The following visitor restrictions are in place for all Canterbury DHB hospitals and health facilities:

  1. All visitors need to scan in using the COVID-19 Tracer App or sign in on arrival and provide their contact details
  2. If you’re using the COVID-19 Tracer App, please ensure Bluetooth tracing is turned on
  3. All visitors must wear a surgical/medical mask. Fabric face coverings are no longer acceptable
  4. All visitors are expected to practice safe physical distancing. You should remain two metres away from people you don’t know
  5. Everyone, including visitors should practise good hand hygiene
  6. Visitors who are unwell should not be entering our facilities.

Patients and visitors should also read the additional more detailed visiting guidelines for each specific hospital.

More COVID-19 information:

Health warning – Algal bloom at Te Roto o Wairewa/Lake Forsyth

Thursday 1 October 2020Media release2 minutes to read

THIS IS AN ARCHIVED PAGE. The advice and information contained in this page may not be current and it should only be used for historical reference purposes.
Health warning  – algal bloom in Lake Pegasus

A health warning is now in place for Lake Forsyth

Canterbury District Health Board’s Community and Public Health unit has issued a health warning after potentially toxic blue-green algae (planktonic cyanobacteria) was found in Te Roto o Wairewa/Lake Forsyth.

People should avoid the lake and animals, particularly dogs, should not be allowed near the water until the health warning has been lifted. 

Dr Cheryl Brunton, Medical Officer of Health, says algal bloom can produce toxins harmful to humans and animals, and people should avoid contact with the water until further notice.

“Exposure may cause skin rashes, nausea, stomach cramps, tingling and numbness around the mouth and fingertips.

“If you experience any of these symptoms after contact with the lake, please visit your doctor immediately and let them know you have had contact with water from the lake,” Dr Brunton says.

No one should drink the water from the lake at any time. Boiling the water does not remove the toxin.

Animals that show signs of illness after coming into contact with algal mats or scums should be taken to a vet immediately.

Fish and shellfish can concentrate toxins and their consumption should be avoided. Further information on gathering Mahinga Kai can be obtained below.

Facts about cyanobacteria:

  • Cyanobacteria occur naturally but can increase rapidly during warmer months.
  • Algal blooms are caused by a combination of nutrients in the water (such as nitrogen and phosphorus), and favourable weather conditions (e.g. increased temperature, calm days).
  • If the water is cloudy, discoloured, or has small globules suspended in it, avoid all contact.
  • Not all cyanobacterial blooms are visible to the naked eye and toxins can persist after the blooms disappear.
  • Cyanobacterial concentrations can change quickly with changing environmental conditions (e.g. wind). If a health warning is in place avoid contact with the water.

For further details visit:

https://www.lawa.org.nz/explore-data/canterbury-region/

Or refer to the Community and Public Health website:

https://www.cph.co.nz/your-health/recreational-water/

For more information about Mahinga Kai:

https://www.cph.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/saf0112.pdf

ENDS

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Page last updated: 19 August 2021

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