COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

Information about changes at Canterbury DHB hospitals and health centres can be found at www.cdhb.health.nz/covid19

VISITORS TO HOSPITAL

No visitors are allowed, except under exceptional circumstancesFurther details...

Last updated:
27 March 2020

  • No visitors are allowed, except under exceptional circumstances. The exceptions to the no visitor policy include:
    • A nominated person supporting a terminally ill patient through their end of life care
    • A parent/guardian who is supporting a child
    • The chosen support person of a woman who is giving birth. This does not apply to the woman’s postnatal stay however, and no visitors will be permitted during this stage of the woman’s care
  • The decision about whether exceptional circumstances apply outside of these exemptions is at the discretion of the Charge Nurse/Midwife Manager or another lead clinician.
  • Children under the age of 16 are not allowed to visit at any time.
  • All visitors will be assessed at the entry to ensure they meet the exception criteria and will be required to register their details.
  • Visitors who are unwell will not be allowed entry.

These restrictions apply to all wards and services at all times, including the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit.

Measles warning issued in Christchurch

Tuesday 4 September 2018Media release2 minutes to read

The Canterbury District Health Board's Community and Public Health team has issued a measles warning after a man who attended Christchurch Hospital's Emergency Department has since been confirmed as having the measles virus.

The 30 year-old man was in the Emergency Department on Sunday 28 January 2018, and patients and visitors who are not fully vaccinated with MMR and were in the department or the waiting room at any time after 1pm are being urged to contact their own General Practice team and get vaccinated urgently.

Staff who were in the area at the time are also being notified. People born before 1969 are considered immune and need not get vaccinated.

Canterbury Medical Officer of Health Dr Alistair Humphrey says measles is highly infectious. “The measles virus spreads easily from person to person through the air, via breathing, coughing and sneezing. It starts with fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes and sore throat. This is followed by a rash that spreads over the body. Complications include pneumonia, inflammation of the brain and damage to the eyes.”

It can take up to 3 weeks for symptoms to appear, and people who were in the Emergency Department after 1pm on Sunday 28 January are being urged to phone their own family doctor/general practice team 24/7 for #carearoundtheclock if they are concerned. If it's after-hours a nurse will answer the call and advise what to do and where to go if you need to be seen.

 “Measles cannot be treated once you get it so the only way to protect yourself is to be fully vaccinated,” says Dr Humphrey. “People are only considered immune if they have received two doses of MMR vaccine and/or have had a measles illness previously and/or were born before 1969.”

Further information on measles can be found on the community and public health website.

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Page last updated: 3 October 2018

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