VISITING HOSPITAL

Hospital visitors must wear a medical paper face mask. Fabric face coverings are not acceptable. Expand this message for more detailed information about hospital visiting guidelines.

Last updated:
16 September 2022

 

Mask exemptions accepted for people seeking treatment
Any member of the public with a mask exemption is welcome in all our facilities when attending to receive health care and *treatment. Please show your mask exemption card and appointment letter to staff at the entrance.

*Treatment includes: coming into the Emergency Department, outpatient appointments,  surgery or a procedure.

For visitors to all facilities effective from Friday 16 September 2022

Some visitor restrictions for all Te Whatu Ora Waitaha Canterbury hospitals and health facilities remain in place, but we have relaxed others.

There is still a heightened risk to vulnerable people in hospital and so people must continue to wear a mask when visiting any of our facilities and follow other advice designed to keep patients, staff and other visitors safe.

Kia whakahaumaru te whānau, me ngā iwi katoa – this is to keep everybody safe:

  • Visitors or support people must not visit our facilities if they are unwell. Do not visit if you have recently tested positive for COVID-19 and haven’t completed your isolation period.
  • Patients may have more than one visitor, except in some situations such as multi-bed rooms where it can cause overcrowding.
  • Surgical/medical masks must be worn at all sites. Masks will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • For Specialist Mental Health Services everyone is strongly encouraged to wear a surgical mask in all inpatient areas and areas where consumers are receiving care (i.e. community appointments, home-visits, transporting people). Discretion may be applied in cases where masks impair your ability to communicate effectively.
  • Visitors must not eat or drink in multibed rooms because of the increased risk when multiple people remove their mask in the same space.
  • Hand sanitiser is available and must be used.

Thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as our staff work hard to protect and care for some of the most vulnerable in our community.

Visiting patients with COVID-19

  • People are able to visit patients who have COVID-19 but they must wear an N95 mask – this will be provided if you don’t have one.
  • Other methods of communication will be facilitated e.g. phone, Facetime, Zoom, WhatApp etc where visits aren’t possible.

All of our Hospitals

Visiting hours for our hospitals have returned to pre COVID-19 hours with the exception of Christchurch Women’s Hospital.

All visitors must wear a medical mask.

Parents/caregivers are able to be with their child in hospital and visitors other than a parent or caregiver are now allowed, except for the Children’s Haematology and Oncology Day stay where just one parent/caregiver is able to attend their appointment with their child. Exceptions by special arrangement only.

Patients and visitors should also read the additional more detailed visiting guidelines for each specific hospital.

More COVID-19 information

New toolkit to help schools support student wellbeing

Wednesday 21 June 2017Media release3 minutes to read

All Right? has launched a free wellbeing toolkit to support young people with their mental health and wellbeing.

Sparklers consists of 36 activities that teachers can use to help their year 1-8 students become calmer, happier, and more ready to learn. The activities take between 10 minutes and 1 hour, are aligned with the school curriculum, and cover a wide range of wellbeing topics including managing emotions, living in the moment, being grateful and showing kindness.

Research associate at AUT University's Human Potential Centre and All Right? Advisory Committee member Dr Lucy Hone, says Sparklers will help young people learn the skills they need to build positive mental health.

“Sparklers enables young people to learn strategies that improve wellbeing and build resilience. The activities are designed to help students feel good and function well, and improve their ability to cope with change and navigate the challenges life throws at them,” says Lucy.

Dr Hone says student wellbeing is strongly linked to learning.

“Students with high levels of wellbeing make better learners, find it easier to focus in the classroom and are able to build stronger and meaningful relationships,” says Lucy.

Canterbury DHB's clinical director for Child Adolescent and Family Dr Harith Swadi, says Sparklers has been developed in response to requests from schools for more support to meet the wellbeing needs of Canterbury students post-quake.

“Schools are crying out for more support so they can meet their students' wellbeing needs,” says Harith. “There's a tremendous desire amongst schools to do more in the wellbeing area but up until now there hasn't been a lot of practical guidance on how to go about it.

“Sparklers pulls together evidence based wellbeing activities in a way that's easy to implement in the classroom. The activities are simple, easy, and proven to work,” says Harith.

“We've piloted Sparklers in several Canterbury schools and the response has been amazing. Schools are incredibility enthusiastic about Sparklers and the activities are making a real difference,” says Harith

All Right? manager Sue Turner says that while Sparklers had its genesis in recovery from the greater Christchurch earthquakes, its content is relevant to tamariki throughout New Zealand.

“We think of Sparklers as a kind of gift to the nation. It's a really positive thing that's come out of the earthquakes, and its benefits will extend far beyond Canterbury,” says Sue.

Sue says in addition to the 36 activities for teachers, All Right? has created six parenting guides.

“The parenting guides provide handy tips and tricks on the key areas parents often ask about, including how to help your child be calm, be grateful and manage worries.

“Raising a resilient and happy child isn't always easy but there are things parents and carers can do that can make a big difference. Just like us, tamariki face daily demands and worries. Knowing what these are and the best ways to address them can prevent little things turning into really big things,” says Sue.   

Sparklers has been made possible thanks to funding from the Canterbury Earthquake Appeal Trust and Canterbury District Health Board and support from the Canterbury DHB's Community and Public Health and School Based Mental Health Team.

Find out more about Sparklers.

Download the parenting guides and information on on nearly 70 Canterbury parenting courses.

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Page last updated: 3 October 2018

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