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Wellbeing

13 documents.

MIQ Mental Health prescriptions cost

  • How many people staying in MIQ facilities have sought assistance from Ministry of Health mental health teams that operate on-site during the same period (16/03/2020 - 16/04/2021)?
  • How many prescriptions/doses of anti-anxiety medications such as Xanax (alprazolam), Klonopin (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), and Ativan (lorazepam) have been distributed to patients in MIQ units? (16/03/2020 - 16/04/2021).
  • How much has the Ministry of Health spent on medications and non-Covid related health.

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People going from MIQ to be detained in mental health facilities

Partial transfer from MBIE: Questions 2,3 and 4: RE People re-entering NZ and going into quarantine. From quarantine, some will be labelled 'psychiatrically disturbed' and they will go from quarantine in mental health facilities.

  • How many went into Mental Health facility and been involuntarily detained?
  • How many are still retained in government institutions?

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MIQ facility staff earning the living wage

The number of workers, not employed by hotels, but working in MIQFs who are currently earning below the Living Wage.

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Supporting the wellbeing of MIQ facility workers in Canterbury: Survey Summary

  • Date: 10 May 2021
  • Document Type:

Background

The Information Team at Community and Public Health (the public health division of the Canterbury District Health Board), was approached by the Canterbury Regional Isolation and Quarantine (C-RIQ) leadership who were concerned by incidents of stigma and discrimination being reported to them by staff working within the Canterbury Managed Isolation and Quarantine facilities (MIQF). In order to inform next steps by the C-RIQ leadership in supporting their workforce, a rapid literature review and a survey of Canterbury MIQF staff was undertaken in late 2020.

You can also read the full MIQ facility workers survey and literature review

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More informationDownload pdf (400KB)

Supporting the wellbeing of MIQ facility workers in Canterbury: Survey report and rapid literature review

Background

The Information Team at Community and Public Health (the public health division of the Canterbury District Health Board), was approached by the Canterbury Regional Isolation and Quarantine (C-RIQ) leadership who were concerned by incidents of stigma and discrimination being reported to them by staff working within the Canterbury Managed Isolation and Quarantine facilities (MIQF). In order to inform next steps by the C-RIQ leadership in supporting their workforce, a rapid literature review and a survey of Canterbury MIQF staff was undertaken in late 2020.

Literature Review

To date, little or no research has been applied to understanding any work-related wellbeing impacts for individual MIQF workers, their whānau, and their communities, as well as any implications for life outside-of-work. The most closely related literature is focused on healthcare and other front-line workers’ experiences within in-patient contexts, for other viral diseases such as HIV, EBOLA, MERS, SARS (although the COVID-19 literature is emerging).

In a high-stress situation, such as a pandemic response, distorted disease perception, misinformation, and fear can trigger reactions from individuals and groups that can disproportionately affect front-line workers (and their significant others) and lead to negative psychosocial outcomes. Stigma and discrimination directed towards front-line healthcare workers have been well documented across several previous viral epidemics including HIV, EBOLA, MERS, SARS, and currently COVID-19, where they have been shown to be strongly associated with low staff motivation, poor staff retention, low morale, reduced psychological wellbeing, and in some cases anxiety and depression.

The applicability of the literature review findings to COVID-19 MIQ facilities in New Zealand needs to be considered in light of the differences in illness severity and the nature of the settings studied in the literature. Despite these differences, previous epidemics and settings share many common elements, and many of the studies propose strategies that might be applied in the context of New Zealand’s MIQ facilities.

You can also read the MIQ facility workers survey summary

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Mental health incidents in quarantine facilities

Incident reports of mental health incidents in MIQ facilities, advice to ministers on mental health in MIQ and learnings from mental health incidents in MIQ.

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Returnees health and wellbeing issues

  • To date, how many returnees have indicated, or it has been discovered by MIQ staff, they have health and wellbeing issues requiring assessment /treatment by a clinician?
  • To date, how many returnees have indicated, or it has been discovered by MIQ staff, they have addiction issues requiring assessment/treatment by a clinician?

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More informationDownload pdf (300KB)

Culturally appropriate Asian health services

What training do all front-line staff (those who deal directly with patients, across all sectors of health) have for providing culturally appropriate services to people from the Asian community?

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More informationDownload pdf (700KB)

Health response to terror attacks

Information about the health response to the terror attacks in Christchurch during March 2019.

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More informationDownload pdf (16MB)

Wellbeing recovery after mass shootings: information for the response to the Christchurch mosque attacks 2019

On Friday 15 March 2019, two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, were attacked by one shooter. To date, 51 people have died from their injuries. Forty-five people were hospitalised on the day of the shooting, and 118 people were treated or admitted by Canterbury DHB in relation to the incident (as at 7 May 2019). 

A rapid literature review undertaken suggests that mass shootings are more intensely traumatic than other disasters, but that the majority of those affected by mass shootings will be resilient.

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Canterbury Wellbeing and Mental Health Recovery Plan

Copy of draft wellbeing and mental health plan to respond to the Christchurch Mosque attacks.

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Canterbury DHB Staff Wellbeing Research Report

  • Date: 1 May 2017
  • Document Type:

This report represents an analysis of the 2016 Staff Wellbeing Survey, focus groups and interviews and other important data available from within the CDHB

More informationDownload pdf (600KB)

Canterbury DHB Healthy Food and Drink Policy

  • Date: 1 Sep 2016
  • Document Type:
  • ID: HP 6456

Healthy Food and Drink Policy , adopted by Canterbury DHB in September 2016

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Showing 1-13 of 13 results, page 1 of 1.

Page last updated: 16 August 2021

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